History

3

History

History at Starbank makes full use of resources within the immediate and wider local area enabling pupils to develop a deep understanding of the richness of the history of their locality. Topics are informed by the national curriculum and aim to ensure that all pupils gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of significant events and people from British and world history.

Topics are planned to stimulate pupils’ curiosity to know more about the past, ask perceptive questions, examine historical sources and weigh evidence to draw their own conclusions. The three threads: invasion and Resistance, Civilisation and Identity, Challenge and Change are used to bring the progression of knowledge together across the year groups.

History Curriculum Map

Year 1

Spring 1
Toys from the past
Toys from the past
Summer 2
History Within Living Memory
History Within Living Memory

Year 2

Autumn 1
Great Fire of London
Great Fire of London
Autumn 2
Local History, Bournville and Cadbury
Local History, Bournville and Cadbury
Summer 2
The Seaside Past and Present
The Seaside Past and Present

Year 3

Autumn 1
Prehistoric Britain
Prehistoric Britain
Autumn 2
Romans
Romans
Spring 1
Ancient Egyptians
Ancient Egyptians

Year 4

Autumn 1
Ancient Greece
Ancient Greece
Spring 1
Anglo Saxon Invaders
Anglo Saxon Invaders
Spring 2
Local History
Local History

Year 5

Autumn 1
Vikings
Vikings
Spring 1
Normans
Normans
Summer 2
The Mayan Civilisation
The Mayan Civilisation

Year 6

Autumn 1
WW2 and the Battle of Britain
WW2 and the Battle of Britain
Autumn 2
Democracy and Crime and Punishment
Democracy and Crime and Punishment

History Progression Map

Year 1Year 2Year 3Year 4Year 5Year 6
Topics CoveredTim Peake ToysGreat Fire of London Cadbury Local HistoryPrehistory Romans EgyptiansAncient Greece Vikings Local HistorySaxons Normans MayansWW2 Crime and Punishment
Questioning…Ask and answer simple questions about what they have heard.Show curiosity by choosing to ask questions about what they have heard or read.Start to frame question and answers in historically valid ways – about change or differences.Ask and answer questions in historically valid ways – about contrast, cause and effect, reliability.Ask and answer questions in historically valid ways – about significance, or the basis of people’s opinions.Ask and answer perceptive questions in a variety of historically valid ways.
VocabularyUse common words and phrases to explain the passing of time.Use a wide vocabulary of everyday historical terms.Start using specialist vocabulary in discussion.Use specialist vocabulary and terms, often appropriately.Use specialist vocabulary and terms, appropriately.Use and apply vocabulary and terms in increasingly sophisticated ways.
Vocab for talk…Tradition, research, event, fiction, non fiction, museum, artefact, curatorDocument, technology, archaeologist, excavate, unearth, similarity, difference, representOrganise, introduce, construct, population, tribe, rural, urban, primary, secondary, source, theory, theme, opinion, revolution, invasionMonarchy, aristocracy, transition, develop, abolish, structure, campaign, ardent, democracy, reliable, reliability, summarise, contrast, critiqueImpact, complex, sustain, generalise, verify, rigorous, inform, phenomenon, analyse, appropriate, characteriseDemographic, hierarchy, doctrine, stance, attribute, controversy, prejudice, robust, authentic, plausible, discern, extrapolate, bias
Vocab for ChronologyLong ago, yesterday, then, now, when, last, before, after, first, second, days, months, prehistoricUsing years, BC/AD, BCE/CE, century, period, later, earlier, since, long, after, before, at the same timeDuring, while, several, more recently, millennium, era, age, chronological, approximate, change, processOccasion, accurate, uncertain, seldom, former, latter, cause, consequence, phase, decline, trend, continuityContemporary, epoch, prior, subsequent, enduring, legacy, dominate, diminish, contextSimultaneous, cumulative, decontextualize
Chronological UnderstandingRecognise differences between the past and present. Use simple words and phrases to help sequence events ‘Long ago’, ‘before my parents were born’, ‘around the time of Jesus/The Prophet’Sequence events and explain their thinking, beginning to make connections over time. Date events to the nearest century (100 years) or era. There may be occasions where dating is more specific, (1666)Note connections over time. Date events more accurately, to the year.Note connections, contrasts and trends over time. Use the year to confidently date events. There may be occasions where dating to months or day.Demonstrate a sense of perspective over history, explaining contrasts and trends in the short and long term.Establish clear narratives within and across periods, at local, national and world level. Prepare for KS3 by securing sense of chronology to inform wider learning.
Identifying Contrasts and ThemesMake simple historical comparisons. Spot the difference, placing items on continuum lines.Independently identify similarities and differences between people, places, events or ways of life. (when subjects or artefacts are provided for them)Begin to note connections within across periods they have studied and drawn on independently. Begin to comment on historical changes, including suggestions about cause and effect. Start to identify themes within and between topics.Note connections, contrasts across time, and place and cultures. Comment on change, cause and effect, and continuity. Identify themes within and between topics.Sequence and structure complex subjects and themes. Begin to suggest reasons for connections across time, place and culture. Comment on the impact of events and their legacy.Compare and contrast places, people and cultures. Be able to analyse their and others’ comparisons. Justifying their ideas with evidence drawn from historical topics taught.